Range Land Technician

Range Land Technician

USDA and Eastern Oregon Agricultural Research Station

May through August 2009

The summer spent working at the Eastern Oregon Agricultural Research Station was my first exposure to both resource management, and long-term large-scale biological research. Working as part of a team, I participated in fieldwork focused on assessing the effect that chemical and physical controls had on both invasive grass densities and native plant communities. We primarily focused on determining the management practices that lead to the greatest reduction in Medusahead (Taeniatherum caput-medusae) and cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) abundances. Simultaneously, we assessed native plant community structure in an effort to determine the success of native grass re-vegetation efforts. This fieldwork allowed me to travel to many beautiful locations throughout eastern Oregon and learn about an ecology very different from what I had thus far experienced. My short-term employment with the USDA opened my eyes to the level of management required to both combat invasive species and to maintain our current agricultural practices. Although invasive species and their management has continued to play an important role throughout my career, the summer I spent in Burns, OR, made me realize how much “behinds the scenes” management is required to maintain our way of life.

 

 

 

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